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Bio & Trauma Scene Cleanup http://bestcrimescenecleanuputah.com Mon, 18 Sep 2017 14:20:33 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.9.8 Outlining the Waste Disposal Process http://bestcrimescenecleanuputah.com/outlining-the-waste-disposal-process/ Wed, 16 Aug 2017 04:15:55 +0000 http://bestcrimescenecleanuputah.com/?p=1075 Biohazardous waste removal is naturally a bit more expensive than traditional garbage disposal, and there are some relatively apparent reasons for this. Death, suicide and blood clean up, among other services offered by Bio & Trauma Scene Cleanup, all involve more steps and significantly more care required than normal disposal. What are the steps that […]

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Biohazardous waste removal is naturally a bit more expensive than traditional garbage disposal, and there are some relatively apparent reasons for this. Death, suicide and blood clean up, among other services offered by Bio & Trauma Scene Cleanup, all involve more steps and significantly more care required than normal disposal.

What are the steps that go into the collection and disposal of biohazardous waste? Let’s take a look.

Identification

The first step during any kinda of trauma or blood-related situation is to identify the type of waste on hand. A very general list of questions that will be asked at the beginning of such a situation:

  • Was the item used to store blood?
  • Is the item saturated with blood, or dripping with blood?
  • Could the item cause infection?
  • Did the item come from a contaminated location?
  • Did the item come from a surgical procedure?

If the answer to even a single one of these questions is yes, the waste will be put into a red biohazard bag – with the exception being if the sample contains anything that might be capable of puncturing the bag. In this case, the waste will go into a sharps container.

Storage

After a red biohazard bag has been filled, it must be placed inside another transportation container before it can be moved. This is to comply with local and federal regulations, and to prevent any leakage or spillage of hazardous waste.

In most cases, the bio bag will be placed in a specialized cardboard box designed specifically to transport this kind of waste. Certain states will require that the waste be put into a specialized plastic tote.

Disposal

Technically, this is the easiest part. Once waste has been placed in the proper sealed containers, the only major factors to ensure are that haulers are trained for the proper transportation of waste, and that waste is transported in approved vehicles.

Want to learn more about the waste disposal process, or interested in any of our cleanup services? Speak to the experts at Bio & Trauma Scene Cleanup today.

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Examples of Biohazardous Waste http://bestcrimescenecleanuputah.com/examples-of-biohazardous-waste/ Sun, 02 Apr 2017 04:30:14 +0000 http://bestcrimescenecleanuputah.com/?p=1078 During clean up after a crime scene, accident or trauma situation, biohazard waste is a common possibility. Biohazard waste is defined as any waste contaminated with potentially infectious agents or materials that may pose a threat to public health or the environment, and at Bio & Trauma Scene Cleanup, we’re here to help with any […]

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During clean up after a crime scene, accident or trauma situation, biohazard waste is a common possibility. Biohazard waste is defined as any waste contaminated with potentially infectious agents or materials that may pose a threat to public health or the environment, and at Bio & Trauma Scene Cleanup, we’re here to help with any and all instances of this waste.

What exactly makes up the broad definitions of biohazardous waste? Let’s look at a few examples of the most common types of waste that may be found during one of these situations.

Contaminated Disposables

In any situation where humans have been handling or storing contaminated materials, disposables are going to be a significant factor. The primary culprits here are things like gloves and other disposal PPE – personal protective equipment, extending to things like masks, hazard suits and other items. Anytime these items have been in any sort of contact with a specimen, culture material or other form of hazard, they need to be properly handled from that moment on.

Plastics

One of the primary storage formats for various forms of biohazardous waste is plastic containers. These containers will include pipettes or pipette tips, culture plates, specimen vitals and other items that may be contaminated. Once these have been contacted by contaminated materials, they need to be properly stored and labeled permanently.

Biological Contamination

In certain cases, towels and bench paper will be used during part of the collection process. These items can quickly become biologically contaminated, and must be removed and managed as solid biohazardous waste in these cases.

Containers

All culture or sample containers contaminated with any biological material will be considered hazardous waste as well. The general rule of thumb is that if an item is “saturated” with blood or infectious bodily fluids, it’s considered biohazardous waste.

Want to learn more about biohazardous waste, or interested in our crime scene, trauma or accident cleanup services? Speak to the pros at Bio & Trauma Scene Cleanup today.

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Standard Biohazard Cleanup Guidelines http://bestcrimescenecleanuputah.com/standard-biohazard-cleanup-guidelines/ Sun, 01 Jan 2017 07:16:05 +0000 http://bestcrimescenecleanuputah.com/?p=1070 As your go-to source for accident clean up and trauma clean up in Utah, we at Bio & Trauma Scene Clean-Up operate under a very strict set of guidelines. Most crime scene cleanup and other forms of hazardous cleaning are governed by the Occupational Health and Safety Administration (OHSA), with a few other organizations also […]

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As your go-to source for accident clean up and trauma clean up in Utah, we at Bio & Trauma Scene Clean-Up operate under a very strict set of guidelines. Most crime scene cleanup and other forms of hazardous cleaning are governed by the Occupational Health and Safety Administration (OHSA), with a few other organizations also potentially involved depending on the type of clean up being performed.

The rules and guidelines established by these governing bodies are strict and detailed, and aimed at preventing any spread whatsoever of hazardous contamination when it’s present. Let’s look at some of the nitty gritty details regarding basic OHSA regulations in place for most businesses and locations:

Initial Assessment of Work

This is a process performed early on a new workspace, intended to ensure that no initial hazards are present. Rules and regulations regarding which chemicals and other products are used must be decided, and proper labeling must be applied to all these products. All potential hazards to employee safety must be noted.

Work Practice & Engineering Controls and Safety

This is the next step from the above – actively working to correct any issues that were found and instituting proper practices. If there are any hazards or damage, this is the stage where they’re actively corrected. In addition, safety procedures and sanitation processes will be established, as will any equipment needs or potential complications.

Method of Compliance

This is generally the inspection phase, to ensure that all employees are following OHSA-mandated guidelines. If necessary, documentation in the form of written notes and photographs may be part of this process. As you can see, the entire name of the game here is preventing possible hazardous issues from spreading if they’re ever present.

Exposure Determination

In cases where an exposure to a hazard takes place, this is where any employee safety concerns regarding these exposures are evaluated.

Hazard Signs and Labels

Any areas with hazards present must be quarantined and properly labeled as such. This uses biohazard tape and other signs to establish specific zones eliminate exposure to dangerous areas.

Want to learn more about these processes, or any other part of our biohazard cleanup services? Speak to the experts at Bio & Trauma Scene Clean-Up today.

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What You Should or Shouldn’t Do if You Have a Crime Scene on Your Property http://bestcrimescenecleanuputah.com/what-you-should-or-shouldnt-do-if-you-have-a-crime-scene-on-your-property/ Sun, 02 Oct 2016 05:48:16 +0000 http://bestcrimescenecleanuputah.com/?p=1061 The unimaginable happens and someone is accidentally or not accidentally hurt in your home, business, or property—you now have a situation on your hands. The police, EMT’s, and a coroner will come and remove the person, conduct their investigation, and be on their way. In many cases, you are suck with what is left: blood, […]

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The unimaginable happens and someone is accidentally or not accidentally hurt in your home, business, or property—you now have a situation on your hands.

The police, EMT’s, and a coroner will come and remove the person, conduct their investigation, and be on their way. In many cases, you are suck with what is left: blood, bodily fluids, and sometimes even body parts.

What should you do with the mess that is left behind? Here are some things that you should or should not do when a crime or traumatic incident takes place in your home, business, or property.

Do NOT Touch or Let Anyone Else Touch Anything

Human fluids such as blood and urine can contain diseases and pathogens, specifically blood. Viruses such as Hepatitis, HIV, and C-Diff thrive in blood, and if you come in contact with such pathogens it is easy to transfer to others.

Act as though every drop of blood is contaminated, even if you think it is clean. The last thing you need is yourself or someone else contracting a disease from unjustified contact with blood.

Do NOT Clean It Yourself

If you have an employee clean up after an incident and they happen to contract a blood-borne pathogen, you and your company will be held responsible.

Those who don’t have the proper certifications and training could mishandle the cleanup, and put themselves and your business at risk. Hire a professional to take care of the cleanup to avoid liability.

Call a Crime Scene Clean Up Services Company

When you are searching for a company to hire, look for ones that specialize in crime scene cleanup and trauma scene cleanup. Professional crime scene clean up companies will have the proper equipment, chemicals, tools, and protocol to safely get your home, business, or property back to normal.

Prepare What Information the Company Needs to Know

Most company personnel can come after the police, EMT, and coroners have left. While you are waiting for them to arrive, get some basic information ready, such as where the incident took place, what happened, contents affected, and if there is an insurance policy on the property.

If You Do Not Have Homeowner’s Insurance, Call Victim Services

If the incident was related to a crime and your claim was denied or you do not have homeowner’s insurance, don’t fret. Every state in the US has Crime Victim Funds in place to assist families that unfortunately go through traumatic incidents.

Crime scenes are delicate sites. For more information on how to handle a crime scene on your property or for any other cleanup services, call Bio and Trauma Scene Cleanup today.

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The Hazards Associated With Hoarding http://bestcrimescenecleanuputah.com/the-hazards-associated-with-hoarding/ Fri, 01 Apr 2016 06:10:39 +0000 http://bestcrimescenecleanuputah.com/?p=1067 At Bio & Trauma Scene Cleanup, we’ve spent years specializing in the trauma cleanup industry. Everything from blood cleanup to specific biohazards – you name it, we’ve seen it. While accident cleanup and other major traumatic events are our most well-known services, you might be surprised at how often we’re called out to help with […]

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At Bio & Trauma Scene Cleanup, we’ve spent years specializing in the trauma cleanup industry. Everything from blood cleanup to specific biohazards – you name it, we’ve seen it.

While accident cleanup and other major traumatic events are our most well-known services, you might be surprised at how often we’re called out to help with another major issue: Hoarding. Maybe you only know it from TV shows, but hoarding is a serious and often life-altering disease, and one that can have major effects on both people and their living spaces. In many cases, the damage will be so severe that a service like ours will be needed.

What are some of the common biohazards found in hoarding situations? Let’s find out.

Excrement

It’s common for feces, urine and vomit to be present in hoarding situations – both from the hoarder themselves and from other people or animals. Many hoarders collect pets and other animals just as quickly as other objects, and the droppings can pose a toxic health risk in short order.

In addition, hoarding can often become so severe that bathrooms and running water are cut off entirely. In some of the worst cases here, people (both the hoarder and others living with them) may be forced to dispose of their waste within the home.

Chemicals

Whether we’re talking drugs or other chemicals, many hoarding collections include dangerous chemicals that often aren’t stored in a remotely safe way. These can cause fires or major health issues if left for too long.

Garbage and Debris

The hoarder may think these items qualify as something more, but it’s very common to find large quantities of garbage and useless items within a hoarding situation. Enough waste poses serious biohazard risks in many cases, and the debris can be a physical danger to anyone in the house as well.

Blood, Needles, Bodily Fluid

Drug abuse isn’t necessarily common within hoarding cohorts, but there are still some cases, and people who use needles for this or any other purpose within their hoarding situation often don’t dispose of them properly or at all. This can lead to the spread of diseases, including HIV and AIDS. Blood that escapes the body and isn’t immediately cleaned up can likewise cause a number of problems.

At Bio & Trauma Scene Cleanup, we specialize in filth cleanup in hoarding situations, as well as many other forms of accident cleanup. Our experts are standing by today to assist you.

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The Dangers of Biological Hazards http://bestcrimescenecleanuputah.com/the-dangers-of-biological-hazards/ Fri, 01 Jan 2016 07:06:28 +0000 http://bestcrimescenecleanuputah.com/?p=1064 After a major accident or trauma, it’s natural to be most concerned with the health and safety of those directly involved. They’re the most heavily impacted, of course, and immediate concerns should be sent in their direction. It’s easy to forget, however, that many of these situations can present real dangers to people who were […]

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After a major accident or trauma, it’s natural to be most concerned with the health and safety of those directly involved. They’re the most heavily impacted, of course, and immediate concerns should be sent in their direction.

It’s easy to forget, however, that many of these situations can present real dangers to people who were not involved in the accident. At Bio & Trauma Scene Cleanup, we’ve seen firsthand the way biological hazards left behind in the aftermath of an accident can affect people who weren’t even close to the actual incident. Our accident cleanup services are here to prevent this from ever happening to you.

What are some of the dangers of biological hazards left uncleaned?

What Are Biological Hazards?

Simply put, biological hazards are living things that can cause illness or disease in humans. Viruses, fungi, bacteria and parasites all count as biological hazards (also called biological agents).

Some biological agents are able to live for long periods of time away from a human body, especially if they have the right breeding ground. Others will die almost immediately after leaving the body.

How Are Biological Hazards Transmitted?

There are two basic ways for biological agents to be transmitted:

  • Directly: Through physical contact, or through injection or projection of mucus from one person to another
  • Indirectly: Through food, water, insects or even through the air

Common Diseases

Biological hazards vary pretty wildly in terms of the complications they can cause in the body. Some are very minor and won’t even be noticeable, where others are very dangerous and could lead to major health issues.

A specific type of biological hazard capable of causing a disease is called a pathogen. Here are some of the most common diseases these pathogens can cause:

  • Viral diseases: Hepatitis, mumps, measles or even a bad case of the flu
  • Bacterial diseases: Things like tuberculosis, food poisoning and tetanus
  • Parasitic worms
  • Fungal diseases: Ringworm, thrush and others

At Bio & Trauma Scene cleanup, we specialize in removing biological hazards completely and professionally before there’s any risk to the public. Our trauma and crime scene cleanup are the industry standard, and we’re available 24 hours a day to help serve you anywhere in northern Utah.

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